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, extremist, very intolerant prejudices that were taking place among the various religions of the world, she said, i grew up in an environment which was christian, which people followed their christian religion. others followed their muslim religion and others their african superstitions. and for me, this went to the heart of why the book became inevitable, or why i have been engaged in this discourse all my life. very strange. i find it very -- pretty close to 80, i should actually exist in an environment in which, for believing what i believe, or not believing what i do not believe, i'd be considered what i call terminal censorship. and go back to my history, and i don't mean me personally. the time when i lived and was raised. the history of my people. when the european explorers, of course, quickly followed by their religious storm troopers, the christian missionaries. they had a very serious problem and that was they couldn't find satan. they couldn't find the devil. if you want to convert people, you've got to first of all persuade them their soul is in dire danger. headed to the ult
to be a pluralistic country where religion is a bridge to cooperation rather than a fissure between people. this is about an hour 20. >> good evening, everyone and thanks for being here. i am very excited to be with my u.s. best friend, eboo patel. i've had a wonderful time reading this book, and am very excited about having this conversation with him and then drawing you into that conversation. one of the delights about his book is his disclosing something of his own spiritual practice, particularly during the holy season of ramadan. he had many when he said that prior to entering the day he would get up, have a small breakfast, and then have a time with -- [inaudible] one of my favorite poets. and i thought it was really wonderful if we all could have kind of a moment of censuring around eboo reading one of his favorite poems. how does that sound? >> all right. thank you for the invitation to thank you all for being here. so, this is a poem that actually first heard where rumi is buried in turkey. come, come whoever you are. wanderer, worshiper, lover of reading but it doesn't matter. ho
to be a pluralistic economy where religion is a bridge to cooperation rather than official between people. this is about an hour 20. [applause] >> good evening and thanks for being here. i am very excited to be with my newest best friend, eboo patel. i have had a wonderful time reading his book. i'm very excited about having a conversation with him and in drawing him into that -- drawing you when that conversation. one of the delights is his disclosing something of his own spiritual practice, particularly during the holy season of ramadan. he had me when he said that prior to entering the day he would get up, have his small breakfast and then have a time with a poem. one of my favorite poets. i thought it would be wonderful if we all could have a moment of centering around one of his favorite running pomes. how does that sound? all right. thank you for that invitation and thank you all for being here this is a poem that i actually first heard in turkey. come, come, whoever you are, wonder, worshiper, lover of leaving. it does not matter. ours is not a caravan of despair. come even if you
's very interested in religion, he's very interested in faith. and even though he did not remain a mormon for his entire life -- it was just as a child, he returned to the catholic church -- it will always be a part of this sort of complex faith journey as he calls it religion's complicated, and his religious story is complicated too. not just because of catholicism and mormonism, but also because he attends a protestant/evangelical church that his wife and her family have participated in. so he's dabbled with a lot of religious practices. >> host: does he attend church today, and if so, where? >> guest: he says he attends catholic mass every sickle day -- >> host: down which -- >> guest: yeah. there's a catholic church just a few steps away from his office, and very easy to get to from him. but when he's here in miami, he lives in west miami, a suburb of miami proper, he attends another church called christ fellowship, and that is an evangelical/protestant-based faith which is a part of the southern baptist convention. >> host: is it a megachurch? >> guest: the it's a big church, somewhe
pretty much believed everything they taught me as far as religion and jesus christ but i was into reading and i liked to read and started getting into history and i discovered a lot of real history didn't reconcile with the bible. so the question is, i discovered a series of books that mentions -- suggests perhaps that there really was no jesus christ, in the historical record, actually starts almost two centuries after this character appeared, and it could possibly be something that was -- i mean, that invention, but how do you address the fact that, for 200 years or so, before there was writing about this, nothing appears no letters from anybody no graffiti, no correspondence between ain't spent people and why does ever when we put this book together i left out all religious figures. i don't want it to be a battle over religion. so much good and bad can come out of religion. but i think it's amazing how much we can agree on, and i felt like i didn't want to put out there something that people could consecutive agree on, so there's no politics, religion, my dodd is better than your god.
rights. the government does that give those rights depended on your religion, economic class, a gender, or theoretically your sexual orientation. that is the way it is supposed to be. some libertarians already get that who have a special obligation to te
with religion, another school? >> is deliberately secular nonsectarian. >> what does it cost to go their four-year? >> i have no idea. >> what would it cost and reverend bliss this day. >> i don't thought that either come over 10 and open a store not offspring and delete, but to people of all ethnicities, classes and that's its appeal, it's mary. >> how is it viewed in the middle east and how is it the reverend bliss opened it? >> all-star with the chronologically earlier one first. there's a lot of suspicion when the school opened in the 1860s. this is run by christian missionaries, americans who didn't have very deep roots in the region, but rather quickly it became apparent to middle easterners who are not just orthodox christians, but this is the best place to get the possible education and within a generation may 1900 have become what it remains to this day, which is the harvard of the middle east. what is magnificent is that it is on collusive this institution founded by americans that exist to serve the interests of the people of the middle east, regardless of background and is an exam
because that, religion is ruled out by the constitution. which is not right, but that's what they said. which led ted olsen -- a very prominent attorney -- to say that since nudity was preferred as prayer as a form of communication, perhaps the students ought to dance naked before the ball game. i thought that was all right unless, of course, they got naked by the dance of the seven veils which would bring the aclu down on their heads, because the dance of the seven veils refers, is found in the bible. >> host: something religion we get into. what, what have you seen in terms of the trend to have court over time, in terms of, you know -- >> guest: well, it's not just the court. that's one reason i say this book is not just for lawyers by any means. what we're talking about is the movement of the culture. we're talking about the movement of social classes within the culture. and that's reflected in the law. constitutional law isn't out there by itself doing these things. there are other forces in the society impinging upon it. now, i think it's probably true that throughout our history
about it as a church and as a religion and also because brigham young is such a figure of broad significance in the 19th century america. >> and the most famous today's mitt romney. does the romney family have interaction with the brigham young plan? >> i'm sure there are many descendants that know each other. the church is still a fairly tight knit institution and especially in utah it means a lot if you have ancestors that go way back to the pioneer era of the church. >> romney does as well. >> why did the family in that in mexico at one part? >> wealthy ended up in mexico because i believe mitt romney's great grandfather practiced marriage, she was a polygamist and later a part in the 1800's case serious effort to incarcerate more men men who produce polygamy and they went to mexico to escape persecution and i'm not an expert on the family history, but i believe mitt romney's great grandfather was among them. >> the wait until he had died before the out of the polygamists? >> it was out what putative is essentially made a federal crime in 1862. but the u.s. government doesn't
the two populations to in congress so different in race, language, religion, and law could be blended together in one harmonious math? after this sort of rousing speech play called for mass meetings around the country to end the war. and people actually took him up on it. i located over 30 meetings in support of his anti-war resolution from indiana to the jersey and louisville to maine. this geographic scope of people who basically are meeting together in public forums and saying, we need to leave mexico and end this war immediately. it's well beyond the opposition of the war of 1812 and constitutes the first national grassroots anti-war movement in american history. i should tell you. what clay asked to have happen was for the united states to leave mexico and not take any territory from mexico altogether . he won a piece without territory which, of course, did not happen. just two weeks after clay's speech, the 30th congress convened in washington and guess who was there? iran led. he heard plays speech in lexington because he was visiting the town on his way from springfield to was
but he basically made up his own religion and this really weird book called something like the secret history of the universe as revealed through occult science in detroit, michigan. i almost used that for my title. he ended up he and his entire family were brutally gruesomely murdered. they were be headed, his children were killed as well, and it was a big sensational story at the time. you can go through the free press archives and find all this coverage and it was never solved. at a certain point i realized it was not far from where i was living so i walked over to check it out and where his house was, so i filed that way and we're the enough, probably a year later there was another murder almost literally across the street. it was a drug thing and these kids were trying to -- their ridge two rival drug houses, they were trying -- these two teenagers were trying to scare off radicals and to do this they ended up killing and then dismembering this guy and scattering body parts around literally across the street from this other murder. again, that was history repeating itself in a wa
-government. religion didn't tolerate it in political culture and family culture does not tolerate it. this is a lost cause. we must not involve ourselves. so he would not involve less in trying to change the culture of the people in the middle east. these are people with no history, political history or religious history of self-government. they don't know what it means. >> and what would you like? >> i'm not quite sure what he was late. >> even federalists would be appalled at the federal government intrusion in our lives today. it is in every area of our lives. veterans commit the troops bedrooms, living rooms, garages, rose, everywhere the federal government is in our lives and that would have appalled the most extreme federalists who founded this type of government. the first thing he would done, patrick and i would have gone right along with him. they would've gone in your bedroom and threats of attack that tag for the mattress. >> will entertain questions for the audience. they urge you in homage brian lamb, founder of c-span who tuning asks the best questions, which are simple and direct, we
and as a young teenager i read the entire bible. the language, leaving aside all talk of religion and focusing on the words that are used in the king james translation, first of all, it is fabulously well written and secondly, so many of those phrasess and rhythms have entered into all of our minds, all of us whether we have ever read the bible or not we know those frayss and we used them and i think i am probably every other riders in the english language has been influenced by the king james translation more than by any of the book. what i'd like to do when i come to manhattan, actually the same as what i do in london. i like to go to restaurants with my friends. >> i read the -- "eye of the needle" and on the wings of eagles and i thought they were both superb. your comment about boy george and communism put something in my mind. have you come across any similar conversations between franco and hitler as to why franco did not declare war on the allies after having accepted so much aid from the not seize and if so could you put me in that direction? >> i have never come across such a convers
," john barry recounts the life of the theologian and his thoughts on the division of religion and politics. former secretary of state madeleine albright recounts her childhood in czechoslovakia during the nazi invasion in "prague winter." in bill veeck, paul dickson details the life of the advocate for racial equality and players' economic rights. damien ec cols in "life after death." for an extended links of various publications' 2012 notable book
to the abolitionists, and so their attitude was you want us to study your language and religion, we'll do it, but at the same time, we're going to invest on our own io deppedty as the mendi people. you could say that their african identity grew as a counterpoint to the idea that they should be civilized pie yous christians. now, all of these tensions were on displace because once the supreme court ruled in their favor and said they could go home, well, the supreme court said they had to have speedometer to pay for the going home, how were they going to get home? well, for the longest time, people believed louis and other wealthy abolitionists paid for this, but, in fact, what happened, the abolitionists with the cooperation of the africans organized a big tour up and down the eastern sea board in which the africans would go and speak and perform their knowledge of christianity, perform their knowledge of english, perform their civilization, and, at the same time, insisted on singing their native african songs, the african side was always there, and here's the wildest part of it all -- the ma
. hamilton responded by saying jefferson was a fanatic in politics and an atheist in religion, and anonymous letter writer once wrote: i think you ought to get a damn kicking, you redheaded son of a bitch. [laughter] so i know, i know karl rove wants to think he invented all of this, but -- [laughter] we've been, we've been fighting these battles for a long time. so jefferson himself saw that we were always going to be divided. he said that men have divided themselves over the opinions of whether the interests of the many or the interests of the nobles should govern the affairs of men since these questions convulsed greece and rome. he was looking back at greece and rome in the way we look back at the founding to try to figure out how much of this division, how much of the divided opinion is natural, how much is unnatural, and how do you manage and try to do what you can with what we have. and his answer, wonderfully, was in theory he would want to go back to monticello. you know those wonderful quotations, we all know them. oh, if i could only be with my books and at my farm and at my famil
that america is freedom. freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of enterprise, and freedom is special and rare. it's fragile. it needs production. so we've got teach history based not on what is in fashion, but what is important. why the pilgrims who came here. who jimmy doolittle was and what the 30 seconds over tokyo met. on the 40th anniversary of d day i read a letter from a woman who wrote to her father who fought over d.day. she said we will always remember and never forget what the boys of normandy did. let's help her keep her word. i'm worning of an eradication of the american memory that could result ultimately in the erosion of the american spirit. let's start with basics. more attention to american history and greater emphasis on sitting ruche l. let me offer lesson one. all great change in america begins at the dinner table. tomorrow night in the kitchen i hope the talk begins and children, if your parents haven't been teaching you what it means to be an american, let them know and nail them on it. that would be a very american thing to do. [applause] i want to thank staff
billion times or more. and guess what? towns and cities and civilizations and cultures and religion and science in the words that we are using communicate with you. propulsion and repetition, persistence and obsessive and driven repetition. the simple rule is an assumption. but the assumptions of health and scientists. but unlike many functions, the termite one wraps around and there is something more antibiotic about it. in fact, they are holding onto a reality that does not exist until the termite makes it. no single termite can make this. the reality that only tens of thousands of termite can make. it is a rule that makes laws were there were no walls and towers were there were no towers and on the very forefront of your brain, they put into world that wasn't there. a world of what could be. a world of possibility. it is an axiom. remember those 165 words i recall it's? those were axioms. and those have strange powers. of how and why. the power of the termite. here comes the problem number three. it is a mystery hidden in plain sight. hidden in one of science's favorite fixations
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)